Rakesh Jhunjhunwala On Investing Your Way To Wealth


wealthymatters.comMr. Rakesh Jhunjhunwala, combines diverse skills as a equity trader, visionary investor and incubator of new businesses through private equity.He is the first dollar billionaire from India to have made all his money by investing–primarily in stocks.Converting Rs 5000 to a billion dollars is no mean feat.Moreover since he deals exclusively in Indian stocks and often in publicly traded companies, whose shares we all have access to,it’s well worth spending time learning how to invest one’s way to wealth from him.

Firstly,Rakesh believes that the choice of asset class is important . As he says”If you bought gold in 1970 and sold it in 1980, you bought the Nikkei Index in 1980 and sold it in 1989 and then bought the NASDAQ [till before the dot-com bust], you would have made 33% compounded returns in three decades.”Personally, under the guidance of Mr Radhakrishna Damani, he made a lot of money shorting stocks at the time of the Harshad Mehta scam post 1992.As he says,”My decision to aggressively invest in the asset class of Indian equities at the right time was a very important determinant of my success.”As Rakesh believes that the mother of all bull runs is still to happen in India ,for people like us,sticking to Indian securities as an asset class might not be such a bad idea! Read more of this post

Indian Philanthropy


wealthymatters.comHere are some major features of Indian Philanthropy as enumerated by eminent Indian businesspeople.They are perspectives that were articulated in response to the Gates-Buffett ‘the Giving Pledge’

1.”India has a very old culture of giving, since the time of Buddha. The concept of philanthropy is not new to us.”—-Rahul Bajaj, chairman, Bajaj Group.

2.”Philanthropy in the first world and in the third world are two different things. In the first world people donate to build a baseball stadium. In India, we have to decide for ourselves what we want out of philanthropy. It is not for the Americans to tell us.”

“shareholders have done more charity than Gates and Buffett put together. How? By allowing Cipla to export drugs for $100 million to Africa, which could have fetched $4 billion if they were exported to the US”—-Yusuf Hamied, chairman & managing director, Cipla Read more of this post

Tata Style Philanthropy


wealthymatters.com

Here is something I found while surfing today.I found it here http://trak.in/tags/business/2007/06/26/this-is-what-lakshmi-mittal-has-to-say-about-his-competitor/ .The blogger believes the words originate from LN Mittal.In which case it would be high praise indeed for the Tatas from a competitor.Even if the note is authored by someone else it doesn’t detract from the fact that Tata Style Philanthropy is worthy of respect and well worth emulating.The picture above shows Jamshedpur.

“Most of us know Lakshmi Mittal to be the richest person in United Kingdom. We also know him as a Steel Industry Baron who took over Arcelor against all odds. However, more than money and business, he is a great human being and never fails to give credit where it is due, even if it means his own biggest rival.

Here is a note written by Lakshmi Mittal after his recent visit to TISCO: (It is long, but well worth the read)

‘I visited Jamshedpur over the weekend to see for myself an India that is fast disappearing despite all the wolf-cries of people like Narayanamurthy (mentor of Infosys) and his ilk. It is one thing to talk and quite another to do and I am delighted to tell you that Ratan Tata has kept alive the legacy of perhaps India’s finest industrialist J.N. Tata. Something that some people doubted when Ratan took over the House of the Tata’s but in hindsight, the best thing to have happened to the Tata’s is unquestionably Ratan.I was amazed to see the extent of corporate philanthropy and this is no exaggeration.For the breed that talks about corporate social responsibility and talks about the role of corporate India, a visit to Jamshedpur is a must. Go there and see the amount of money they pump into keeping the town going; see the smiling faces of workers in a region known for industrial unrest; see the standard of living in a city that is almost isolated from the mess in the rest of the country. Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: