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NR Narayana Murthy On What We Need To Learn From The West


wealthymatters.comThe following is from a speech delivered by Mr. Murthy, when he recieved the Lal Bahadur Shastri National Award for Excellence in Public Administration and Management Sciences.

I don’t think we “need to learn” these things as much as be aware of these differences when dealing with Westerners and vice-versa. We have our ways and they have theirs with a a different set of reasoning behind them.Personally I feel neither way is right or wrong.They are merely differences. But sensitivity to them makes interaction and doing business easier.And in any case thing are not as simple as Mr Murthy lays them out.Indians not totally lacking in these qualities and the West is not without its lapses.An a good way to start might be to avoid stereotypes. Read more of this post

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Narayana Murthy On Ratan Tata


wealthymatters,comWhat are your fondest memories from your interaction with Tata?

” When we inaugurated our management council room, which I believe is the most advanced council room with perhaps the finest technology in Asia, I had a discussion with my colleagues and we decided to name it after Jamsetji Tata. Jamsetji Tata, as you know, was an extraordinary businessman. He donated one-third of his wealth to start the Indian Institute of Science.

So, when we decided to name the management council room, I decided to invite Ratan to inaugurate that. He was a little bit surprised that we were naming our number one conference room after Jamsetji Tata. I told him, ‘Jamsetji is a beacon and an example on how businesses should be conducted.’ He came and inaugurated it, he had lunch with us, interacted with youngsters. And every one of my colleagues was so impressed with his grace, courtesy and humility.”

How India’s Wealthy Are Related By Marriage And Business.


How India's Wealthiest Are Related By Marriage And Business

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Indian Philanthropy


wealthymatters.comHere are some major features of Indian Philanthropy as enumerated by eminent Indian businesspeople.They are perspectives that were articulated in response to the Gates-Buffett ‘the Giving Pledge’

1.”India has a very old culture of giving, since the time of Buddha. The concept of philanthropy is not new to us.”—-Rahul Bajaj, chairman, Bajaj Group.

2.”Philanthropy in the first world and in the third world are two different things. In the first world people donate to build a baseball stadium. In India, we have to decide for ourselves what we want out of philanthropy. It is not for the Americans to tell us.”

“shareholders have done more charity than Gates and Buffett put together. How? By allowing Cipla to export drugs for $100 million to Africa, which could have fetched $4 billion if they were exported to the US”—-Yusuf Hamied, chairman & managing director, Cipla Read more of this post

Tata Style Philanthropy


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Here is something I found while surfing today.I found it here http://trak.in/tags/business/2007/06/26/this-is-what-lakshmi-mittal-has-to-say-about-his-competitor/ .The blogger believes the words originate from LN Mittal.In which case it would be high praise indeed for the Tatas from a competitor.Even if the note is authored by someone else it doesn’t detract from the fact that Tata Style Philanthropy is worthy of respect and well worth emulating.The picture above shows Jamshedpur.

“Most of us know Lakshmi Mittal to be the richest person in United Kingdom. We also know him as a Steel Industry Baron who took over Arcelor against all odds. However, more than money and business, he is a great human being and never fails to give credit where it is due, even if it means his own biggest rival.

Here is a note written by Lakshmi Mittal after his recent visit to TISCO: (It is long, but well worth the read)

‘I visited Jamshedpur over the weekend to see for myself an India that is fast disappearing despite all the wolf-cries of people like Narayanamurthy (mentor of Infosys) and his ilk. It is one thing to talk and quite another to do and I am delighted to tell you that Ratan Tata has kept alive the legacy of perhaps India’s finest industrialist J.N. Tata. Something that some people doubted when Ratan took over the House of the Tata’s but in hindsight, the best thing to have happened to the Tata’s is unquestionably Ratan.I was amazed to see the extent of corporate philanthropy and this is no exaggeration.For the breed that talks about corporate social responsibility and talks about the role of corporate India, a visit to Jamshedpur is a must. Go there and see the amount of money they pump into keeping the town going; see the smiling faces of workers in a region known for industrial unrest; see the standard of living in a city that is almost isolated from the mess in the rest of the country. Read more of this post

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