My World Or The World


wealthymattersOne day, Sage Narada came to Mount Kailas, a mango in his hand. Kartikeya’s eyes widened when he saw the mango; Ganesha’s mouth watered. “Who is it for?” they asked in unison. “It is for Shiva’s better son,” replied Narada, a mischievous glint in his eye.  Parvati realized what Narada was up to:  the cunning sage had taken upon himself the impossible task of making parents choose a favorite child.

All eyes turned to Shiva. “Better son? What’s that?” Shiva wondered, “Sons are sons. Some are older, some are younger. Some are taller, some are fatter. Some are stronger, some are smarter. How can one be better?”

“Here is how,” said Narada, “You create a measuring scale. He who measures better is the better son.” Shiva looked at Narada not quite understanding what was said. So Narada elaborated, “Well, creating a measuring scale is easy. You can say that my measuring scale is obedience – he who is more obedient is the better son. Or you can say that my measuring scale is money – he who makes more money is the better son. Or you can say that my measuring scale is achievement – he who can do the impossible is the better son.” Read more of this post

Ten Characteristics Of Self-Made Billionaires


wealthymatters1. High Sensitivity and Awareness

Beyond perceived eccentricities for things like timing, color, food, fragrance or texture, a self-made billionaire’s sensitivities can be heightened to the point of distraction, isolation or even debilitation. On the positive side, they each have their own unique sensitivities and heightened awareness that can seem extrasensory: everything from design functionality and perfect pitch, obsessions over air and water quality, knowing—with certainty—when someone else is dealing with a crisis. However, what’s special about the self-made billionaire is how they find ways to leverage their sensitivities and awareness to increase performance. Read more of this post

The Fluid Nature Of Wealth


wealthymattersChanchala, the restless and whimsical one, who does not like to stay in one place, is one of the names of Lakshmi . She loves to move around and so people are advised not to keep images of her in the house where she is shown standing; she may feel unwelcome and she may leave. So in traditional images she is always shown seated comfortably on a lotus.

The whole point of this rather visual characterization is to inform people that wealth loves to move. The value of wealth emerges only when it exchanges hands. Lakshmi’s symbol is her foot print and it is always drawn pointing into the house. The idea being to align the restless and mobile nature of the goddess with our own desire to see fortune favor us.

Realizing the criticality of Lakshmi’s movement, rituals were created to encourage the flow of wealth in society. Typically, on festival days people were advised to wear new clothes. New clothes meant income for the weaver which in turn meant income for dyers, spinners and farmers who grew the cotton and silk. People were also encouraged to break old pots and buy new pots in festival time thereby boosting the income of potters and the economy. In festivals like Dhanteras, people are encouraged to buy metal, especially iron and gold which in turn helped metal smiths and miners.Another important ritual was the exchange of gifts, especially food items, either prepared at home or bought from the sweet shop and shared with friends and neighbors. During festival time, the arts were encouraged thereby providing livelihood to artists. Musicians, dancers, singers, street performers were invited by landlords to entertain the village. Read more of this post

Lakshmi, Saraswati And Wealth


wealthymatters

The common belief is that Lakshmi (goddess of wealth) and Saraswati (goddess of knowledge) always fight and avoid staying in the same place. This is based on the observation that rich businessmen tend to be uneducated and educated people tend to be poor. This is also based on the assumption that Saraswati is the goddess of education, learning and training. This understanding of Saraswati is rather pedestrian, and lacks insight. Read more of this post

Lakshmi And The Owl


wealthymattersIn Orissa and Bengal, Lakshmi images include a white owl. In local belief, white owls have come to be associated with auspiciousness and good luck because of their association with the goddess. Who is this owl? Scriptures do not clarify.

Some say, Lakshmi rides the owl; others believe the owl simply accompanies her, while she rides on a elephant, the latter being a more appropriate vehicle for the goddess who is associated with wealth, power, and royal splendour.

Owls are solitary creatures, who sleep all day and prowl at night. Because of their nocturnal activity and screeching call, they have been associated with bad luck and death, leading to the conclusion that she is Alakshmi, Lakshmi’s elder twin, the goddess of strife and misfortune. But because of its round eyes that never move and stare straight ahead, the owl has been associated with wisdom . The term “lord with circular eyes” (Choka-dola) is used to refer to Jagannath, the form of Krishna-Vishnu worshipped in Puri, Orissa, leading to speculation that the owl actually represents Lakshmi’s consort, Vishnu. Favoring this line of thought, is the fact that in Hindu mythology, the vahana or vehicle of a deity is always male, not female. But the idea that Lakshmi would ride her own husband, though acceptable to feminists, is abhorrent to traditionalists. They insist that the owl accompanies the goddess; she does not ride it. If she does not ride the owl, then it could be  either Vishnu, or Alakshmi. Read more of this post

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