Advertisements

Are you a Saver or Spender ?


wealthymatters.comEver wondered if you were more of a saver or a spender ?I do.I know I’m a PAW by using the calculator here:https://wealthymatters.com/2011/01/17/am-i-wealthy-calculator/ .But I have a long wish-list of investments I’d love to own.And any cash that I get in hand I tend to use to buy one of them.But that dents the balance in my bank accounts and I start feeling a bit deprived.I crave the security of cash.Totally illogical,but true.My brain can grasp that the money has just moved from one head to another but my gut can’t.

If you too wonder whether you are a spender or saver why not take the short quiz here ?http://www.moneymatterstome.co.uk/7-Personal-life-choices/Sub1/Activity-AreYouASpenderOrASaver.htm  and to double check you could click on the first link and use the calculator there to see if you qualify as a PAW.

Advertisements

Some Financial Thumb – Rules


wealthymatters.com

Financial thumb-rules are rough guides for making sensible financial decisions .However they have their  infirmities and so need to be used in the right context.Following are a few basic financial thumb-rules:

  1. Pay yourself first rule: From any money you make, put away atleast 10% first before you pay any bills or debts or do anything else with the money i.e. make your investments the first obligation on your money.The general idea is that this money will start working for you by earning interest , gaining in capital value or giving you rents etc. and in time you will need to work less and less as your money starts working for you.
  2. The emergency fund rule: Build a corpus equal to 3-6 months worth of expenses of your household.Life is uncertain and you never know when somebody might meet with an accident , fall sick , suffer losses in business , lose a job or suffer loses due to fires or natural calamities ,war, civil strife etc.The money is to take care of immediate expenses,provide a cushion to fall back on till you find your feet again and if necessary provide a small stake to start over again.The money needs to be kept in a safe place where there is no chance of loss of capital and where it can be withdrawn immediately and without hassles.
  3. 100 minus your age rule:This is a thumb-rule to determine how much of your paper assets should be in equities.The general idea is that as you grow older and wealthier you want less volatility and less risk of capital loss.Volatility might complicate withdrawls from the corpus in retirement and lost capital might not be so easily made up for later in life, after retirement.
  4. The 10,5,3 rule : This rule states that you can on an average expect returns of 10% on equities,5% on bonds and 3% on liquid cash and cash-equivalent accounts in the long run.It’s important to remember this rule before reaching for that extra half percent that might lead to capital loss. Read more of this post

Learn Wealth Building From The Millionaire Next Door


wealthymatters.comDo you want to be a millionaire? Then perhaps you should start by studying the habits of millionaires….. And this book is just the right place to start.

If you check lists of the best financial books of all time,  you’re bound to find several that include The Millionaire Next Door: Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy. Written in 1996 by professors William Danko and Thomas Stanley, its main premise is that people who look rich may not  be wealthy; they overspend — often on symbols of wealth — but actually have modest portfolios and, sometimes, big debts. On the other hand, many actual millionaires tend to live in middle-income neighbourhoods, drive economical cars, wear inexpensive watches, and buy suits off the rack.

Following are some of the gems of wisdom found in the book that the authors Danko and Stanley have gleaned from their thousands of surveys of millionaires.

#1: Income Does Not Equal Wealth
Yes, higher-income households tend to have more wealth than lower- and middle-income households. But the size of a paycheck explains only approximately 30% of the variation of wealth among households. What really matters is how much of the income is invested. On average, millionaires invest nearly 20% of their income.

Danko and Stanley even offer a “simple rule of thumb” formula for determining whether you have a net worth that is commensurate with your income:

Multiply your age times your realized pretax annual household income from all sources except inheritances. Divide by 10. This, less any inherited wealth, is what your net worth should be.

Those in the top quartile of wealth accumulation are prodigious accumulators of wealth (PAWs), according to Danko and Stanley. Those in the bottom quartile are under accumulators of wealth (UAWs).This formula also helps in sorting out the millionaires/millionaires-to-be(PAWs) and the millionaire-lookalikes(UAWs).Here is a calculator to do this calculation easily:https://wealthymatters.com/2011/01/17/am-i-wealthy-calculator/

#2: Work That Budget Read more of this post

Am I Wealthy ? Calculator


wealthymattersIn the book ” The Millionaire Mind” the authors Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko explain the concept of Prodigous Accumulators of Wealth (PAWs) and Under-Accumulators of Wealth (UAWs). For their age and income levels,the PAWs are people who have accumulated an exceptionally good amount of wealth and the UAWs are those who fail to impress on the wealth front.This is because many people with huge incomes have equally large expenses because of their lifestyle choices.To check if you are a PAW or UAW use the calculator here Link  .

Congrats if you are a PAW!

And if you are wondering just how wealthy you are in global terms? Check here: Link

%d bloggers like this: