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Effect Of Long Term Capital Gains Tax On Equity Investments


Effect Of Long Term Capital gains tax On Equity Investments

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Balanced Mutual Funds


 

wealthymatters.com

Balanced funds are mutual funds that invest in both equities and debt instruments.They normally keep their equity component in the range of 60%-75% and the  rest in debt products or cash.Some balanced mutual funds are considered to be more aggressive in that they have a larger equity component.For example, HDFC Prudence keeps its equity allocation around 75% in most of the cases and rest 25% in debt or cash. However,others like Reliance Regular Savings Balanced are considered less aggressive and have a lower equity component around 60-65% .

From the taxman’s point of view, any mutual fund which has equity component more than 65% is considered as an “Equity Fund” and so long term capital gains from sale of balanced mutual fund units too are exempted from tax after one year just like in the case of pure equity mutual funds . Read more of this post

India And Gold


wealthymatters.comThe picture on the right might be what comes first to mind when a lot of people think about India and gold–A bride decked out in gold ornaments.

Here interesting facts about Indians and gold:

India is the world’s largest buyer of gold, accounted for 32% of the global demand in 2010.

India’s annual consumption demand has risen from an average of 300-400 tonnes (1998-2004) to about 900-1,000 tonnes in the last three years (2008-2010).

India’s demand for gold rose by 106% Y-o-Y,in 2010, substantially higher than the 60% recorded by the second-fastest growing market- China.

Indians invest over 11% of the gross savings in gold, against less than 2% by the Chinese. Read more of this post

Learning From Sir John Templeton


wealthymatters.comSir John Templeton (November 29, 1912 – July 8, 2008) was a legendary investor and a pioneer of global investing. He took value investing to an extreme, picking industries and companies he believed to be at rock bottom, or as he called it “points of maximum pessimism.”He bought when there was blood on the streets. For example,when investors fled the New York market after the Second World War was declared, Templeton borrowed $10,000 to scoop up stocks priced at less than a dollar, often in companies that were near bankruptcy. In four years, he sold the stock, paid off the debt and pocketed $40,000—the seed money for Templeton Growth Fund, a market beater for many years.

Templeton did not care where a company was located. If it was selling below what he considered to be its asset value, and if it was in an industry or nation that was “out of favor,” he was interested in it. He was among the first to invest in postwar-Japan and among the first to sell out of Japan in the mid-1980s. He was one of the very few who invested in Peru when the communist Shining Path was running rampant, and by doing so, he reaped a fortune for his investors.   Read more of this post

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