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Tax – Saving Fixed Deposits


wealthymatters.com

In Budget 2006, the government extended tax benefits under section 80C of Income Tax Act, 1961 to five-year tax-saver deposits. As per this provision, a tax-payer is eligible for exemption on five-year deposits on investments up to Rs 1 lakh. These fixed deposits are locked in for a five-year period . There is no option of premature withdrawal. Also, you cannot pledge this type of term deposit as collateral to secure a loan to meet liquidity needs. Similarly, banks do not offer overdraft facility on tax-saver deposits.Unlike the plain vanilla fixed-deposit products, these tax-saver FDs do not have the sweep-in facility. This means a person cannot link fixed deposit to their savings account so that the surplus funds in the savings account can be automatically invested in this fixed deposit.In addition, there is no overdraft facility available on the tax-saver FD. As this instrument of saving money is special due to its tax-saving status, banks do not extend relationship benefits on the tax-saver FD. Read more of this post

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Running The Interest Rate Race


wealthymatters.comIn inflationary times fixed income instruments may not be such a great idea , especially if the interest rates are just not that high.But there is no way we can avoid these instruments.

1.We need them to add steadiness to our portfolios especially when the stock markets show volatility.

2.We need  them to  park the money we plan on using within a definite time horizon.

3.We need them again  when we have to route a steady stream of  payments into another investment and want to simultaneously avoid both the risk of a capital loss due to a short term investment in a mutual fund and the low returns of a liquid fund.

In such a situation we just need to find the highest possible interests which our funds can earn in a given time over and above the rate of inflation while simultaneously reducing the risk of capital loss. Read more of this post

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