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India’s Contribution To Silicon Valley


 

wealthymatters

Indians have founded 33.2% of Silicon Valley’s immigrant-founded startups — more than immigrants from any other ten countries combined have, including China, the UK, Canada, Germany, Israel, and Russia.

From 1995 to 2005, immigrants founded 52% of Silicon Valley startups, and 25% of startups in the US. They contributed to 72% of the WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) patents filed by Qualcomm, 65% of those by Merck, 64% of General Electric, and 60% of Cisco Systems. Indians also co-author 13.7% of America’s global patents.

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Hotel Saravana Bhavan And Steve Jobs


WealthymattersHere is a nice story I found in Quora. Enjoy!

About five years ago, one evening, just as I had sat down with my wife and daughter at Saravana Bhavan, a South Indian vegetarian restaurant in Sunnyvale, in walked Steve Jobs with his wife and son. They sat down on the table behind us. It was a busy school night and the place was packed with loud kids and hungry Indians vying for attention of the woefully inadequate staff. Like the clientele at this hangout – mostly Indian techies looking for cheap but authentic food – the staff is also authentic Indian: many speak limited English only and are not aware of the rich and famous of the Silicon Valley. Read more of this post

Be Uncomfortable If You Would Be Successful


Reality check: Why denial is bad businessWhen you sit in Vajrasana – the yogic posture with your knees bent, your body takes it for a while and then revolts. If you prolong the position, you get a taste of what Indian yogic torture feels like! But Vajrasana has to be mastered if one has to progress in Yoga.

In business also, being ‘uncomfortable’ is being progressive. Being comfortable is slipping into ‘denial’ and into danger zone.

Take, for instance, the cases of Mark Zuckerberg (CEO of Facebook) and Mark Pincus (CEO of Zynga – a rags-to-riches-to-rags games company).  Read more of this post

The High Beta Rich


Robert Frank’s new book “High-Beta Rich-How The Manic Wealthy Will Take Us To The Next Boom,Bubble And Bust” is based on interviews with more than 100 people with net worths (or former net worths) of $10m or more. These include the Blixseth family, former billionaires who had to lay off all 110 staff in their enormous residence; the Siegels, who had to abandon the largest private house in the US before it was completed; and Jack Warner, who built a fortune from various business, but ended up a penniless handyman.It is also a tale of how the financial crash of 2008 has affected the US more generally. It includes numerous unemployed former butlers, unoccupied mansions and falling tax revenue for fiscally-pressed state governments. In addition, Frank tells the story of upmarket repo men who specialise in repossessing planes, yachts and the like from indebted millionaires.So basically Frank revisits the lives of the people he profiled in Richistan, and follows up on what has happened to them in the years since he wrote the book in 2006. By 2011, some of these rich people have since gone from riches to rags, or merely to less affluence. His follow up on the people whose jobs it was to serve the needs of the rich shows how many of them are now finding it hard to secure stable jobs from the rich since the 2008 .Since the book with vivid sketches of how the rich, and the formerly rich, really live  is a sequel to Richistan, published in 2007, in which he profiled the lives of the rich before the recent financial bust, do read it before starting on this one. Read more of this post

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