5 Negotiating Blunders


wealthymatters

Every entrepreneur has to spend some time negotiating, whether it is with customers, suppliers, investors, or would-be employees. But the moment something careless just slips out while negotiating ,you get into trouble.Following are words you must never say in the course of a negotiation:

1. The word “between”: It often feels reasonable—and therefore like progress—to throw out a range. With a customer, that may mean saying “I can do this for between Rs 10,000 and Rs 15,000.” With a potential hire, you could be tempted to say, “You can start between April 1 and April 15.” But that word between tends to be tantamount to a concession, and any shrewd negotiator with whom you deal will swiftly zero-in on the cheaper price or the later deadline. In other words, you will find that by saying the word between you will automatically have conceded ground without extracting anything in return.

2. “I think we’re close.”: We all experienced deal fatigue,i.e.the moment when you want so badly to complete a deal that you signal to the other side that you are ready to settle on the details and move forward. The problem with arriving at this crossroads, and announcing you’re there, is that you have just indicated that you value simply reaching an agreement over getting what you actually want. And a skilled negotiator on the other side may well use this moment as an opportunity to stall, and thus to negotiate further concessions. Unless you actually face extreme time pressure, you shouldn’t be the party to point out that the clock is loudly ticking in the background. Create a situation in which your counterpart is as eager to finalize the negotiation (or, better yet: more eager!) than you are. Read more of this post

Psychology And Bad Market Timing.


wealthymatters.comEvery stock investor whether a technical or fundamental or value investor ultimately needs to take a call on whether he/she wishes to buy or sell at the price Mr. Market sets at any given time.How much an investment ultimately nets a person depends on the timing of the buy and sell decision and the actual price at which the transaction takes place,despite all the theories of averaging out and time in the market and reversion to the mean.

The following is a checklist of mental mistakes that may affect a person’s decision to buy or sell and cost a him/her dearly. The checklist is from Whitney Tilson’s presentation ‘How to Avoid – and Profit From – Manias,Bubbles and Investor Irrationality”

•Failing to Buy

–Status quo bias

–Regret aversion

–Choice paralysis

–Information overload

–Hope that stock will go down further (extrapolating recent past into the future; greed) or return to previous cheaper price (anchoring)

–Regret at not buying earlier (if stock has risen)

•Office Depot at $8 (vs. $6) Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: