Before The Big League


Some people know what they want to do from an early age and focus on it relentlessly. Others are driven enough to reinvent themselves, changing careers and industries, and continuously pushing until they find what works for them. As a reminder that the path to success is not always linear, here are the highlights of what some successful people were doing at age 25:

wealthymattersMartha Stewart worked on Wall Street for five years as a stockbroker for Monness, Williams, and Sidel. Before that, she was a model, booking clients from Unilever to Chanel.In 1972, Stewart left Wall Street to be a stay-at-home mom. A year later, she started a catering business and became a household name and an empire unto herself.

At 25,Arianna Huffington was Arianna Stassinopolous,and after meeting famed journalist Henry Bernard Levin, she travelled to music festivals around the world with him as he wrote for the BBC. Now she is best known for her news website The Huffington Post, she is also an author,speaker and a syndicated columnist. Read more of this post

The Most Effective Way To Get Rich


wealthymattersThere’s a story of an Italian Billionaire who when asked if he had to start over from scratch what he’d do replied that he’d take any job to make $500, buy a nice suit, then go to parties where he’d meet successful people. The implication being that he meet someone who’d offer him a job, share an opportunity, etc.

I’m almost 40 and of the 5 career type jobs I’ve had in my life (I run my own business now), 4 came through networking. Only 1 came out of applying to a job listing.

But networking isn’t something you just go out and do. It’s immensely more effective if you have simple people skills. And when I say simple, I mean spend a couple hours reading Dale Carnegie’s “How to Win Friends and Influence People.” Read that and try it out at a party and you’ll be blown away by how effective it is and how after meeting and talking with a few people and asking them about themselves, how they’ll want to help you, without you asking them.

When I asked my old boss who was the most remarkable sales person I’ve met, what he did to improve his sales skills, he told me that right out of college without any skills or pedigree degree, he took a job as a limo driver. He was reading “How to Win Friends and Influence People” and thought it would be worth trying out. He would ask his customers one simple question when they got in the limo, “So tell me about what you do.” That simple question resulted in a huge increase in tips he received. Notice he didn’t ask his customers, “What do you do?” There’s a subtle difference. If you ask the latter, many people will just tell you in a few words what they do. If you ask the former, it’s an invitation for them to tell you their story. Few people will turn that down. Read more of this post

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