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3 Things Gates Learnt From Buffett


wealthymatters

Few people in the US are more successful than Bill Gates. But that doesn’t mean the billionaire knows everything. There are still important business lessons to be learned by America’s richest man -and who better to learn them from than Gates’ friend and fellow billionaire Warren Buffett? Earlier this year Gates traveled to Omaha for Berkshire Hathaway’s annual shareholders meeting. He outlined the three most important lessons he learned from Buffett.

Look at the Big Picture

When Gates first met Buffett, his immediate instinct was to focus on the surface of his success: picking and investing in stocks. But Gates quickly learned that key to Buffett’s success runs much deeper -it’s about the big picture of a business. “He has a whole framework for business thinking that is very powerful,“ Gates writes.

Be Honest with Shareholders Read more of this post

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Buffett’s Productivity Hacks


wealthymattersOne day Buffett went up to his pilot named Steve and jokingly said to him that “the fact that you’re still working for me tells me I’m not doing my job.You should be out going after more of your goals and dreams.”

To help him with that, Buffett asked Steve to list the 25 most important things he wanted to do in his life.Then Buffett asked Steve to review each goal and choose the five most crucial ones.After considering a moment, Steve drew circles around five fantastic goals, confirming with Buffett that yes, indeed, they were his highest priorities.

“And the rest?What about these other 20 things on your list that you didn’t circle?” Buffett asked. “What is your plan for completing those?” Steve knew just what to say.”Well, the top five are my primary focus but the other 20 come in at a close second,” the pilot said. “They are still important so I’ll work on those intermittently.”

Buffett suddenly turned serious.”You’ve got it wrong, Steve,”he said.”Everything you didn’t circle just became your ‘avoid at all costs’ list. No matter what, these things get no attention from you until you’ve succeeded with your top five.” Read more of this post

Before The Big League


Some people know what they want to do from an early age and focus on it relentlessly. Others are driven enough to reinvent themselves, changing careers and industries, and continuously pushing until they find what works for them. As a reminder that the path to success is not always linear, here are the highlights of what some successful people were doing at age 25:

wealthymattersMartha Stewart worked on Wall Street for five years as a stockbroker for Monness, Williams, and Sidel. Before that, she was a model, booking clients from Unilever to Chanel.In 1972, Stewart left Wall Street to be a stay-at-home mom. A year later, she started a catering business and became a household name and an empire unto herself.

At 25,Arianna Huffington was Arianna Stassinopolous,and after meeting famed journalist Henry Bernard Levin, she travelled to music festivals around the world with him as he wrote for the BBC. Now she is best known for her news website The Huffington Post, she is also an author,speaker and a syndicated columnist. Read more of this post

12 Facts About Warren Buffett And Money


wealthymatters1.) 99 per cent of Buffett’s wealth was earned after his 50th birthday.

2.) Berkshire’s Book Value has beat the S&P 500 in 43 out of 44 years on a five year rolling average basis.

3.) Buffett’s net worth of $63.3 billion is greater than the combined GDPs of Ghana and Cambodia.

4.) Buffett is “ready“ to double his investment in renewable energy ,bringing the total to an amount that could build 46 Burj Al Arabs.

5.) In 2013, Buffett made on average $37 million per day.

6.) Buffett has so far donated enough money in his life time to build 4 Apple ‘Spaceship’ Campuses.

7.) If you invested $1,000 in Berkshire Hathaway in 1970, you’d have $4.86 m today. Read more of this post

The Superinvestors of Graham-and-Doddsville


wealthymattersThe Superinvestors of Graham-and-Doddsville is a seminal essay by Warren Buffett.

Buffett begins this essay by imagining a nationwide coin-flipping contest. Everyone in the US participates and calls the flip of a coin. Call correctly and move on to the next round, guess wrong and you’re out.After 20 days, about 215 lucky flippers will have correctly called 20 consecutive flips. They gloat about their success, yet the nature of coin-flipping tells us they’re just lucky. It’s a game of random chance.

But what if all 215 flippers lived in the same town? What if they all hailed from the same school? The same fraternity? Then we’d get excited. The laws of probability suggest 215 winners after 20 days. But those same laws tell us that if all 215 belonged to an associated group, that almost certainly wouldn’t be the product of random chance. These 215 flippers clearly would know something we don’t.

The real flippers in Buffett speech are nine “superinvestors” — himself included. All nine crushed the market averages over multiyear periods by between 8% and 22% per year.In a world with millions of investors, such returns can occur by sheer luck — just like the 215 coin-flippers appeared at first glance. But all nine superinvestors hailed from the investment school of Benjamin Graham and David Dodd — Columbia professors now known as the fathers of value investing. That meant something big. It meant that their success wasn’t the product of luck. It almost had to be attributable to the only common link they shared: the investing philosophy learned from Graham and Dodd. The “intellectual origin,” as Buffett put it. Read more of this post

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